Unpublished, Unseen 2010

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Varanasi, India, 2010

 

Over the past thirty years, I have taken nearly a million pictures.   Many of them have been published in my books, in magazines, and seen in my exhibitions, but a majority have never been seen.  Here are a few of those unseen pictures that I have taken in the past few months.

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India, 2010

 

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Mandalay, Burma 2010

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Burma 2010

Shwedagon, Pagoda, Burma, Myanmar, Rangoon, Yangon, February, 2010.

Mandalay, Burma, February, 2010

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Burma, 2010

 

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Burma, 2010

Steve McCurry Hasselblad

Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2010

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Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2010

57 Responses to “Unpublished, Unseen 2010”

  1. I loved the photographs! especially the ones from Varanasi. I am operating Spiritual walking tours of Varanasi for a long time in the name “Crescent banks & its secrets”. Would love to have you on one of our walks to make it inspirational for both, you and me. http://www.vedicwalks.com/#!varanasi-ganges-walk/ccgh

    Katherine

  2. I first visited the shwedagon in 1963 and again in 1966 before the 1970 earthquake. I have not visited myanmar for a long time and was planning to visit yangon next year as my mother is buried in Yangon. I would like to see the changes that have occurred to the shwedagon as many changes resulted due to the earthquake. EG the staiways to the temple. What I would like to see is some photo’s prior o 1970. prior to the restorations. It would be great to see that the restoration has been done well. The shwedagon is a living monument and is used daily so it will never be enshrined in a fixed time in history. I would like to see a record of the pagodas history maintained along with changes to the pagoda. I would like to see the pagoda kept for the people and not just become a tourist attraction.

  3. Dear Steve,

    your website and pictures are just the best inspiration I could get. I love photography and I believe they are really the essence of human life on earth. your pictures are just so amazing I can only wish to learn from you in the near future. you present the best of life. good luck on everything.

  4. I really like the first pic appearing in the blog. But in a nutshell, they all are great.

    I also would be glad to visit India some day – it’s a beautiful country.

  5. Pure brilliance ! Thank you.

  6. Hi Steve,

    I regularly visit your official web site, but had no idea about this blog, until now. A great surprise!

    I first went to India just over ten years ago, and have been attracted to that country and Asia ever since. Today, i can say without hesitation that you are the one who made me buy my first camera, pack my bag and go. As a teenager, i would spend hours at my local library going through your and other photographers’ books, but your images always had the strongest impact on me. It’s still very true today and your work has been, and continues to be, a major influence in my approach of photography.

    I recently saw the exhibition in Paris, rue de Seine. Fantastic! I was impressed by the size of some of the prints. The Holi shot is pure magic!

    It’s a pleasure to be able to view your unpublished work here. Please, do keep those photos coming.

    Best,

    fred

  7. Hi Steve,

    I regularly visit your official web site, but had no idea about this blog, until now. A great surprise!

    I first went to India just over ten years ago, and have been attracted to that country and Asia ever since. Today, i can say without hesitation that you are the one who made buy my first camera, pack my bag ang go. As a teenager, i would spend hours at my local library going through your and other photographers’ books, but your images always had the strongest impact on me. It’s still very true today and your work has been, and continues to be, a major influence in my approach of photography.

    I recently saw the exhibition in Paris, rue de Seine. Fantastic! I was impressed by the size of some of the prints. The Holi shot is pure magic!

    It’s a pleasure to be able to view your unpublished work here. Please, do keep those photos coming.

    Best,

    fred

  8. excellent…. great photograph..
    expert photographer!!!

    – dFlix -

  9. Such beautiful photography, keep up the good work!

  10. Jeff J Silber Says:

    Hi Steve,

    Just looking at your images gives me personal inspiration and in many ways they are educational.

    This is the mark of a truly GREAT human being who has given so much to the world.
    On behalf of humanity I thank you and may you blessed to continue your superb hard work for many years, as did another GREAT artist Pablo Picasso.

    Cordially,

    Jeff

  11. Steve McCurry | Unpublished, Unseen Picture 2010…

    Steve McCurry, one of my main source of reference photographer that comes with quality and priceless picture, over time and still be. Seen here are his unpublished picture of 2010 but worth seeing…….

  12. One subject, clean background, color contrast gets a good shot most of the time. I like how you play with that.

  13. Thanks so much for this priceless gift, a pure delight*

  14. These are such a treat to see!! I am especially intrigued by the shots of Burma. We have a rather large community of Burmese here in the San Francisco Bay area and some of my friends are actively learning the language in order to assist the community. They were thrilled to see these images :)

  15. Sinjan jana Says:

    Hi Steve,

    I’m from in India and I follow your work. Your work always pushes me to see my own country in a different a different light. I guess that’s magic.

    But, there is one question which is keeping me unsatisfied. When you shoot pictures of people in Afghanistan, how do you communicate with them and how do you manage to take their photos without making them camera aware?

    Keep them coming. All the best.

  16. Hello Steve,

    That elephant picture with the man next to him is as surreal as it can get. It’s almost like a clip you’d see from Tarzan.

    I just have a quick question:
    When you go on a shoot, how much gear do you carry with you? I guess it depends on what you are shooting, but I’d suspect you’d travel fairly efficiently due to the locations you are shooting in.

  17. Amazing show in Sao Paulo!!!
    I have an answer for the question about what make a great photographer like you.

    It is THE EYES: the beauty in the world that your eyes find and eternize in the moment of the picture. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and you find a way (photos) to transport-transfer that to us, from the most remote places.

  18. Pedro Says:

    Llevo dos años estudiando fotografia para dedicar mi tiempo a viajar y crear imagenes como estas, de las que Vd es un referente de primer orden . Su trabajo es magnifico, nos recuerda lo mejor de nosotros mismos.

  19. Always amazing you shoot Steve…
    thanks for sharing :)

  20. Beautiful. I miss Chiang Mai … it’s been 20 years since I have been there and I have heard it’s really changed a lot. They are all beautiful but I especially love the shirts on the line and the monk in burma standing in the doorway … and the elephant! :)

  21. Wonderful work as ever! I love that one of the elephant and the guy on the rock.

  22. Steve, my emotions awaken your pictures. I smiled with the cat and I wanted to meet the woman of the last photo.

    You’re the one.

    Love, Camille

  23. […] Barbecho fotografico, por Steve Mc Curry […]

  24. Steve,

    Tell me you can also take an occasional flub shot. Even if it’s a lie, it would make the rest of us amatuer photographers feel much better.

    Humbly,

    brandon

  25. Hey Steve!

    It’s great to see some of your pics from the India trip. And – no shadow of a doubt – you are the No. 1!

    Kind regards

    Thorge

  26. Hi, thanks for sharing these unseen pieces… I’ll be happy when I can take this quality of images though :-)
    As other people, I find the guy next to the elephant a wonderful and simple picture!
    Thanks and take care!

  27. Kevin Mayo Says:

    The shot of the elephant and the boy is a great slice of life from that part of the world.
    Thanks for posting some unpublished shots.

  28. They are all exceptional, I like them all – and in particular the one where the young monks in Burma play football, as they say, is something for the masses to enjoy and as in many cultures across the globe is an endemic representation of modern culture everywhere!

    Thanking you for bring your new work to us!

    Ta

    Musa

  29. Dear Steve,

    What a treat! Thanks for sharing your photos. Hope all is well.

    Regards,
    Arman
    Abu Dhabi

  30. Hello Steve,

    I was fascinated to see your photograph marked “Burma, 2010″ where a young monk leans on the door frame.

    I very much in love with your photographs and I feel extremely curious to ask that how did you approach the subject ? were you waiting patiently for the shots to happen ?

    I am in love with photography and would be grateful if you kindly suggest about some approaches. For example, when I try to shoot I feel hesitated about the outcome of the shot or the angle from where I am looking at the subject. Should I go on shooting without paying attention to my hesitation ?

    Please advise.

    • Arup,
      With Steve’s permission, I cite here some of his quotations in answering an interview question with “Outdoor Photographer” magazine, published in its February 1999 issue which were really interesting and helpful for me:

      “Actually, I’m naturally kind of shy. I’m not inclined to just walk up to someone and put a camera in their face.
      But to take photos of people, you have to get out on the street, out of the hotel room. You need to push yourself a bit. It’s kind of ballsy to walk up to people with a 50mm or wider lens. They see and acknowledge you. I try for the candid photo first. Once they become aware of you, the candid moment is gone. I talk with them (hiring a translator if necessary), explain what I’m doing or maybe just a friendly, “I’m just out taking pictures.”
      You have to work through the uncomfortable, embarrassing moment when people become aware of the camera. You stay with the situation and keep going past the fake smile. I also try to project an attitude that this is normal, what I do; I’m not embarrassed, I’m willing to be here for hours.
      Actually, I might come back over a period of days. The first photos are often “posey” and unnatural. But as they get used to you photographing them, they relax. You can see it in their body language. When they kick back, that’s when honest photos happen.”

      Best
      Ehsan

  31. amazing. that’s it..going back to film!!

  32. Ayten Says:

    Amazing views!!! Thanks for sharing your experience…

  33. Beautiful work! My favourite is the photo of the friendship between a boy and an elephant. They seem to have known each other for years!

    Thank you for sharing.
    //J

  34. Hi Steve,

    the second one is fantastic, other are great ! :)
    Nice to see your unpublished work.

    Thanks

  35. Grace Says:

    Stunning, Steve.

    Love the melancholy colors in the first one, the light strewning through raw clothes in the second, the dynamic

    of the 3rd, the light in the 4th, the delightful symmetry in the 5th, the haunting faces of the 6th, the

    composition of the 7th, the tenderness and mystery of the 8th, and the pure, serene beauty of the 9th.

    Just beautiful. Hope to see more.

  36. Steve,

    These are simply amazing. The Burma series is wonderful. Did you shoot the Burma series with your Hasselblad?

  37. Great Steve.

    I’ve always wanted to see your unpublished work.
    Please keep showing more. How about pictures from the Kumbh Mela?
    I’d love to see what you shot there.

    Thanks,
    Cathy

  38. Deigh Bates Says:

    Thanks so much for sharing those with us – as always spectacular. the last image of the woman is gorgeous.

  39. You continue to amaze and delight me with your photos. Thank you for sharing them.

  40. All images are excellent, Steve. I like the one of the elephant leaning against the young man.

    And, the light on the beautiful young girl in the last image is powerful.

  41. Hi Steve,

    There is very good video of yours in youtube. Key points which I leaned from this are – elements of composition, light and emotional element.

    Thought to share with all those who follow you on you blog.

    Please feel free to take this comment out if you find it in appropriate for blog.

    Regards,
    Pawan

  42. Splendidi ritratti e colori meravigliosi che mi fanno viaggiare con la mente. Complimenti

  43. Beautiful as usual, but looks different than your older images.

    best regards,

    Jos Runarka

  44. Thank you so much for sharing these wonderful pictures of people and life in parts of the world I have not yet seen. Your photography is inspiring in it’s ability to capture a moment or a person with such clarity and beauty.

  45. What beautiful photos capturing the spirit of the places and people. I love the picture of the elephant baby and his boy resting on the rock.. Thank you for bringing us closer to these worlds so far in distance to mine yet close at heart. Stephanie Alt MS

  46. Domenico Says:

    An other piece of art. I’m happy can see your unpublished 2010, sometimes beautiful pearls are in hidden places.

  47. Hi Steve,

    Amazing shots as usual!

    Wanted to tell you I’ve recently travelled Kashmir Valley inspired by a photo of you of a man rowing on Dal Lake on a boat full of flowers.

    What an amazing place Kashmir is.

    Thank you
    Valerio

  48. Hi Steve,

    I like second and last one (Chiang Mai) most.
    :)

    Regards,
    Pawan

  49. scott Says:

    What lovely pictures, Steve. The last one of the lady in Chiang Mai has a special intensity. I also really like your utilization of the staircase as part of the the “flow” in the visual composition of the boy monks playing football . Great stuff!

  50. Unguarded moments … thanks for sharing, and wish to publish more often the ‘unseens’.
    Hope to see you someday here in Iran.
    Ehsan

  51. Thanks for these – I spent about 3 years in and out of Burma, mostly working on the river. It is a magical place in many ways and seeing pictures always takes me back there. http://www.insinuendo.co.nz/?page_id=17

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