The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010

INDIA-11024Rabari Magician

Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome,  stops developing the iconic film forever. When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll. When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons. Here are a few of those last 36 frames.

USA-10289Actor Robert De Niro in his screening room in Tribeca, NYC

USA-10294Grand Central Terminal, New York, one of the most important and beloved architectural icons in the city

Kodachrome was my mainstay film, the  film I used for 30 years.

INDIA-11028Rabari Girl

INDIA-11034Rabari Woman

I have about 800,000 Kodachrome transparencies in my archive.  It  was probably the greatest film ever made.

TURKEY-10042Turkish photographer Ara Guler, nicknamed “The Eye of Istanbul” is the dean of Turkish Photographers and a friend of the late Henri Cartier-Bresson

INDIA-11037NF2Amitabh Bachchan, the most prominent actor in the history of Indian cinema

USA-10393Elliot Erwitt, Magnum Photographer, known for his wit and whimsical humor, photographed in his studio, Central Park West, NYC

USA-10298I shot the final frame in a cemetery in Parsons, Kansas

“Kodachrome, they give us those nice bright colors they give us the greens of summers, makes you think all the world’s a sunny day, oh yeah.” -Paul Simon

264 Responses to “The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010”

  1. […] Steve McCurry narrates the story of this exhibition very briefly on his blog and you can read it here. Most of people can remember Steve McCurry from his iconic photo Afghan Girl, […]

  2. […] out McCurry’s blog post about the experience and some selected pictures he took with the last roll, half part taken in NYC […]

  3. […] the very last roll of film to use. McCurry published the photos online, titling the collection “The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010” (viewable on his blog). It’s quite a nostalgic story that really puts perspective on the […]

  4. Amazing eye. So sad that film is almost gone.

  5. […] production in the mid-90s all the way until the last Kodachrome roll ever to be produced in 2009. Look here to see what was caught in the last roll of Kodachrome […]

  6. […] production in the mid-90s all the way until the last Kodachrome roll ever to be produced in 2009. Look here to see what was caught in the last roll of Kodachrome […]

  7. […] and notes. We have all taken like ducks to water to digital photography (to the extent that film is beginning to die out) because the computer better preserves our images as long as we have sensible precautions in place. […]

  8. […] can check out some of Steve’s final images on his blog using the last roll of Kodachrome […]

  9. […] Travaillant essentiellement avec de l’argentique et adepte des pellicules Kodachrome, l’entreprise lui a remis la toute dernière pellicule sortie de l’usine avant la fermeture en 2009 de cette marque historique. Ces 36 dernières photos argentiques sont désormais visibles ici: http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com/2010/12/30/the-end-of-an-era-1935-to-2010/ […]

  10. Pictures amazing natural and succesfull

  11. […] For decades major publications would accept photographs on no other media. Recently photographer Steve McCurry trekked through India with the "last roll of Kodachrome" in his camera. The results are […]

  12. […] After our trip into the world of crazy colors, magenta cast, and pinkish faces in Tribute to Kodak Ektar, today let us look at almost the opposite: the old Kodachrome II colors. So you might ask, how the hell I came up with Kodachrome now? The answer is rather simple: Steve McCurry's work is shown at the Besharat Gallery in Castleberry Hill, here in Atlanta. Steve McCurry is famous for the picture of the Afghan girl (among many other things). Steve also took some of the most striking 9/11 pictures I have ever seen. And, he is also the the person who shot the last roll (ever) of Kodachrome (see here and here). […]

  13. I have spent over an hour on your site just mesmerized by the incredible photos.
    What a sad story on this post… Unbelievable that you were the one to take the final photos on Kodachrome.
    Keep up the good work just doesn’t seem to be powerful enough.
    Thank you!

  14. I must admit that I saw several times the documentary of National Geographic Channel, about Steve McCurry and the last roll of Kodachrome. I’ve recorded and it’s on the top of my faves.

  15. I’m almost crying… This is so sad… I just hope there will always be chrome. Maybe someday we get Kodak to come back in their decision. Kodachrome is amazing and I never had the chance to use. :(

  16. I saw the documentary today…well done, fabuluous work, fabulous photographs. I enjoyed hearing how you prepared to use the last 36, the thinking and purpose and intent behind it all. It was also quite intriguing you preciously guard each frame. And then, as you waited for the film to be developed, like an expectig father in the waiting room.

  17. web city…

    […]The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog[…]…

  18. […] Here are some of the shots by Steve McCurry from the last roll. […]

  19. I like your photos very much. thank you for any of it. that’s intersting.

  20. Leica Review…

    […]The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog[…]…

  21. […] only an occasional Kodakchrome shooter, mostly for fun. Earlier this year, after being inspired by Steve McCurry and his final Kodachrome project, I embarked on a personal project to document a few ‘last […]

  22. […] dernière, et Kodak a d’ailleurs envoyé le dernier rouleau à McCurry, qui lui a rendu un bel hommage grâce à ces dernières […]

  23. […] the very last roll of Kodachrome film produced was given to famous photographer, Steve McCurry.  http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com/2010/12/30/the-end-of-an-era-1935-to-2010 to shoot “old-school” film […]

  24. […] viaggio, con last roll, attraverso le 32 immagini scattate in giro per il mondo con l’ultimo rullino prodotto dalla […]

  25. […] view of Turkey. Mr. McCurry was asked to participate in the project when he was in Turkey shooting the last roll of Kodachrome. Those pictures were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in Istanbul.“I think it’s […]

  26. […] tomadas con el último rollo de la mítica película diapositiva de Kodak, ya fuera de producción. Este último rollo fue confiado al famoso fotógrafo de National Geographic Steve McCurry, el de la niña afgana, y el último fotograma fue tomado en el cementerio de Parsons […]

  27. […] previously unseen side of Istanbul.  Read more about “The Last Roll of Kodachrome” on McCurry’s personal blog. Advertisement GA_googleAddAttr("AdOpt", "0"); GA_googleAddAttr("Origin", "other"); […]

  28. If I could spend just one day with Steve Mccurry….

  29. The Last Roll of Kodachrome…

    Istanbul Modern is hosting Steve McCurry’s exhibition “The Last Roll of Kodachrome” from August 3rd to September 4th. McCurry received the very last roll of Kodachrome that came off the assembly line in Rochester, New York. 31 pictures of this last …

  30. fara74 Says:

    Для всех граждан РФ.

  31. […] informacón | blog de Steve McCurry me gusta 5 Para votar identifícate o regístrate aquí. Tweet Categorías: […]

  32. Dear Mr McCurry, i watched the documentary of your last roll of Kodachrome… i’m not a fan of films, i started shooting in digital, and i’m not so captured by the fashination of film…
    In the doc i’ve seen that you used a D3x for the test shots… i’m curious, and i would like to see a comparison of the test pictures with the kodachrome’s photos…
    It would be great…

  33. Estupendo homenaje al Kodakchrome…..

  34. […] Read more about this in his blog here: [Steve's Blog] […]

  35. How it hurts that I never got to shoot with this film! Such an awe-inspiring medium!..

  36. Great web site, Thank you!

  37. […] has it that the last film lab stopped process Kodachrome in 2010.  Today’s cameras are changing photography, while opening […]

  38. I understand you decided to use a nikon F6.

    Which lens(es) did you use?

  39. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve… […]

  40. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve… […]

  41. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve… […]

  42. […] came across Steve McCurry’s blog post the other day about shooting the last roll of Kodachrome and it made me a little […]

  43. […] and notes. We have all taken like ducks to water to digital photography (to the extent that film is beginning to die out) because the computer better preserves our images as long as we have sensible precautions in place. […]

  44. awesome pictures very artistic!

  45. […] ery fotografii “analogowej”. Słynny fotograf publikujący w National Geographic – Steve McCurry na swoim blogu pokazał zdjęcia z ostatniego wywołanego filmu […]

  46. […] roll to shoot images in New York City and in India, as well as a few in Parsons, Kansas, where he took that last roll to be developed. The project will be the subject of a National Geographic documentary to air in May, and […]

  47. […] un voyage nostalgic de 6 semaines autour du monde, Steve mcCurry présente  en guise d’adieu sur son blog quelques unes des 36 photos ainsi […]

  48. Frank Schifano Says:

    Thank you for posting these very moving shots. It’s more an just the Kodachrome.

  49. mirror men Says:

    hi~I am an editor of a creative magazine in China,i like your works very much. We want to use the last three pictures in one page to introduce the event, can you provide us the hi-resolusion types? If you are agree,i will give you my email.Thank you ~

    • Hello,
      Thank you for looking at my blog. Please contact studio@stevemccurry.com to request pictures.
      Best,
      Steve

      • Mitch Walker Says:

        Saw all your images on Vanity Fair’s website. It was great to see all you shots together and in the order you took them. I was going through boxes of slides I shot through the years and discovered I had shot more Kodachrome than Ekachrome. I worked in a military photo lab in the seventies and ran an Ekachrome processor. But Kodachrome was my film of choice at that time and years after that.
        I hope you ar planning a book sometime in. Near future.

        Wonderful work….

  50. Excelente trabajo.
    Buena forma de hacer un homenaje a las legendarias Kodachrome.

  51. […] The end of Kodachrome is definitely ends something for many photographers. Dan Bayer runs his kodachrome project, here you can find memorial of Kodachrome by Steve McCurry. […]

  52. Amazing to see that you could make so many great photos from 36 exposures. It will be interesting to know how long you carried that film in the camera.

  53. You photos are great. Love to see all 36 exposures you shot.

  54. […] I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons. Here are a few of those last 36 frames. – Steve […]

  55. lrexer@aol.com Says:

    When the daguerreotype became obsolete in the 1860s, people — photographers — recognized immediately that a great visual resource was being lost, but the commercial infrastructure no longer existed to support the medium. Nothing personal, nothing to do with aesthetics, except that in the very instant of its disappearance, it was suddenly possible to see medium’s properties in a way impossible before, because they were suddenly freed of any “industrial” or practical responsbilities. The daguerreotype became gratuitous and beautiful. Resurrected 140 years later, it was no longer a necessity but an option for image makers, and its only reason for use was (is) as a medium of art. Kodachrome follows exactly this trajectory: at the moment of eclipse it is laden with historical resonance, carrier of collective memory, but utterly surpassed for photography except in its peculiar chemical beauties, which can never be replaced. Is it possible that someday, somewhere someone, a member of the antiquarian avant garde, will find a way to revive the process? Untiltn hen, like the prophet Isaiah, photographers will ask, “How long, O Lord, how long?”

  56. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog from: stevemccurry.wordpress.com on 7 January 2011 […]

  57. […] hand delivered that very roll to Dwayne Parson after he was finished shooting.  He has posted some of the last 36 photos on his blog.According to The New York Times, the very last roll to be processed belongs to Dwayne Parsons […]

  58. […] The Last Roll of Kodachrome at Steve McMurray’s blog.   McMurray got to shoot the very last roll to get processed. He made some wonderful images with it, and reminded me of how great that old, beautiful film base truly was. If you ever got to shoot it, you know what I’m talking about. […]

  59. nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..nice…^_^v…………nice…^_^v…………..

  60. Not sure if anyone mentioned that Kodachrome used to come in 8×10 format, at least through 1940 when Louise Dahl-Wolfe shot fashion for Harper’s Bazaar.
    Imagine that…

  61. Nice work, as usual. Some of us are still waiting to get our final rolls back from Parsons; as I write this they still haven’t turned off the K-14 processor. It’ll probably have to go for a couple more days yet. Amazingly, the chemistry has outlasted the backlog, like some ancient crock of tri-colored oil.

    I don’t know about you, but after this I’ve got a pile of Fuji films to use up.

  62. The following quotation most clearly describes your photography, very likely describes you as a man.

    `A good photographer makes an image by holding the camera to his eye.
    A great photographer makes an image by holding the camera to his heart.’

    Thank you Steve

  63. Anonymous Says:

    I just digitized a Kodachrome slide I shot while in college – in 1970. The scan is good, but there is something about holding the very piece of film that I shot 41 years ago. As a visual resource “slide librarian” and semi-pro photographer, I have been personally involved in the digital transition for many yrs. It is the end of an era and a certain mind-set, but it is our creative mind and eye that make the art – not the media. I look forward to retirement and going pro as a photographer.

  64. Brilliant .. what next Mr Steve. What will you shoot with? Also always wanted to ask you Do you shoot Digital?

  65. Farewell film… Hope to see you in the future…

  66. […] Steve McCurrie has posted the pictures he took with the last roll of Kodachrome off the production line. […]

  67. pegappp Says:

    This is history of photography now…
    Great work

    Pega
    http://www.pegaphoto.com

  68. couarraze Says:

    Hi. I feel very sad today. I have never used Kodachrome, but used Fuji Velvia and Provia for 10 years. I finally left my films at home for the first time during my last trip to India to shoot digital. It was a tough decision to make.

  69. Thurman Mason Says:

    Hi Steve, quite an honor. I loved the red and yellow flowers (orchids, I believe they were). What a great final touch for the final frame.

  70. What a decision it must have been to decide how to use that final roll. Beautiful shots, and the last is, of course, just so appropiate…

  71. Hola Steve, buenísimo tu trabajo pero te equivocas en decir que Ese laboratorio en Kansas es el último del planeta, no creo que sea ni siquiera el último en Norteamerica en revelar rollos. Yo y muchísimos fotografos aficionados utilizamos rollos aqui en Argentina y hay una inmensa variedad de laboratorios. Es demasiado grandilocuente decir “The last lab on the planet”.
    Saludos!

  72. Hi Steve! That last roll HAD to be for you, no one could have given it a better use :) Greetings from Huelva, still remember the day I met you in person!

  73. […] McCurry and the last roll of Kodachrome: http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com/2010/12/30/the-end-of-an-era-1935-to-2010/ This entry was posted in general. Bookmark the permalink. ← Vivian […]

  74. Your kodachrome photos are what convinced me at 15 years old that photography would forever be the passion that binds me. The end of kodachrome is a sad day, and bekons future sad days as film becomes more “obsolete”. There is no doubt your talent and gift will continue to bless us with beautiful photographs. Thank you for inspiring me to capture the beauty that surrounds us all.

  75. I remember the only timely processing of Kodachrome was New York Color, and we used it prolifically when I was assisting Greg Heisler for a couple years.. ah the joys of late night editing on the slide projector!
    I’ve got 18 rolls of KR25 inc. processing, exp 12/88 .. any takers ?

  76. Julian Tocaciu Says:

    It is a very sad day! Your photographic tribute to Kodachrome is moving!
    Your photographic work is superb, I am a big fan of yours.
    Best of luck in 2011!

  77. […] Take a peak at some other images from Steve’s roll on his blog. […]

  78. when i went to afghanistan in 1978 you were for sure an inspiration for me…..and for the years that followed….what a beautiful well thought out use of what will be history…the last roll of kodachrome film….it is hard to believe….i am glad you were the photographer to do this…what a great career…..

  79. Great and sad page.
    Thanks for sharing your sorrow and reminding us all that the good things are not around for ever…. and are not always replaced by satisfactory alternatives.
    Your pictures are beautiful.
    Thanks +++

  80. De Niro… was he:)

  81. Time for a new song from Paul Simon

  82. While I feel that my voice seems so small in this sea of so many of your fans, I’d just like to say that this last set is beyond words. I cannot think of any other subjects that are worth capturing with this last roll of Kodachrome. You sir, are really a true inspiration to all photographers out in the world.

  83. Luca Canzi Says:

    Thank you Steve.
    For All.

  84. Steve, there are many photographers in the world who use Kodachrome now. If you have lack of Kodachrome process, you can buy films and reagents.

    http://shop.ebay.com/?_from=R40&_trksid=p5197.m570.l1313&_nkw=kodachrome&_sacat=See-All-Categories

    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/3658525.html

    http://www.chemos-group.com/

    Also you cat contacting with one of the Kodachrome Photo Engineer:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/members/photo-engineer/

    Thank you for you beautiful pictures!

  85. […] que desistiu. A notícia não teve muito destaque na mídia; fiquei sabendo através do blog de Steven McCurry, que vem a ser o autor da foto ao lado, talvez a imagem jornalística mais famosa de todos os […]

  86. zoe2020 Says:

    The cemetery made me sad.
    Mama, they took my Kodachrome away
    Not saying that’s the end of my day
    But to sway the minds of the instant play to play
    doesn’t seem strange
    doesn’t seem wise
    doesn’t seem all that surprising
    when all those pixels are uprising
    Vibrance has left the building…

  87. Muy buenas fotografias! el fin de Kodachrome? increible! saludos.

    cal

  88. […] was laid to rest.  Steve McCurry has some beautiful images on his blog from the sentimental last roll.  While I never had the chance to shoot any of this iconic film, I […]

  89. It was in the early 50’s that I first used Kodachrome, and remember saying on a bright sunny day. “Ah, it looks like a 1/50 @ f/8 day”, but I’ve now moved into digital and enjoy the easy computer manipulation. Ansel Adams manipulated B&W in the darkroom but with Kodachrone, you needed to be “right on” with exposure and filter (if used).

    Now where are those 35 to 50K of slides that I need to digitize, but maybe not all!

  90. Saw this on Ewan McIntosh’s blog this am at the exact moment the song Kodachrome came on my satelite radio. Seriously!
    Trivial? Perhaps.
    Perhaps not. Rest in pece Kodachrome.

  91. It is the end of an era, not just kodachrome but seemingly film in general. Kodak are slowly discontinuing many of their best films and chemical papers. Naturally they are not in my good books at the moment!

    Hope you continue to work for many years to come. Although its a big loss nothing can substitute for vision and hard work! I wrote a piece on your photograph of the Afghan girl recently, admittedly not on the technical aspects but on the progressive meaning of that image from 1985 to present day. Check it out if you have time, would be lovely to hear your opinion. Best wishes, take care!

    Daniel

    http://c41blog.wordpress.com/2010/12/19/34/

    http://c41blog.wordpress.com/2010/12/22/how-context-determines-photographic-meaning-part-2/

  92. […] photographe Steve McCurry vient de publier dans son blog les photos de la toute dernière pellicule Kodachrome produite, que Kodak lui avait offerte. On y retrouve la touche de ce célèbre reporter qui est […]

  93. I sent two rolls of Kodachrome 40 Super 8 cine film to Dwayne’s a couple weeks ago, but haven’t received anything back yet! Hopefully they just got waylaid!
    Kodachrome you will be missed…

  94. Steve,
    Your a legend.

    Jack English

  95. jack Simpson Says:

    As always, cracking photos :) Re: Kodachrome film, I shot one roll (64-36exp) in my life ( a freebie from a mate) and the majority was shot through a Greyhound bus (going through the Canadian Rockies) and one shot took a
    3rd place in a camera club competition (back in late 80’s) :)

  96. Man I loved K25. So smooth. I remember rushing out to Rockville for overnight processing of K25 and K64. Shot one job on 120 Kodachrome and it took a week to get processed. Wrote a blog piece in 2009 about how Kodachrome influenced my life.

    http://www.camerondavidson.com/blog/2009/07/05/how-kodachrome-influenced-my-life/

    Several years back I wrote a piece on Shorpey’s and their amazing Kodachrome 4×5 collection.

    Check out this for some amazing colors in the forties.http://www.shorpy.com/image/tid/179

  97. […] leave it to the images themselves. Mccurry’s last developed Kodachrome pictures are located here. For more pictures, ACL has had a pretty rabid fascination with them and has included tons of […]

  98. Really amazing!

  99. ojalá las cámaras digitales kodak fueran la mitad de buenas que sus rollos de película…

  100. The only thing better than the 35mm Kodachrome slides was 70mm Kodachrome….
    Digital is fine but is so sterile sometimes… It is everything to everyone so it’s personality is suspect.

  101. allstarphotography Says:

    Thank you for commemoration of the event. Personally, I began photography in the pre-digital era, but I did not become proficient until after digital arrived; therefore I respect those who are masters of film. You have inspired me to press my Elan 7e back into service. I guess I’ll try Kodak High Definition 400.

    Again, thanks for sharing your work.

  102. […] info | stevemccurry.wordpress.com 0 Categorias: Fotografía Analógica, Galerías Tags: famosos, […]

  103. A very fitting tribute.

  104. I spent years as an assistant with this film, it had magical properties. I would buy it for the photographer I worked for in “Bricks” and we went through tons of it. It was wonderful to receive it back from the labs and put it up on the light table. So many great images were captured using this film.

  105. MARIANO Says:

    GRACIAS

  106. alaricalbarda Says:

    Kodachrome is dead :-( long life for Kodachrome images :o)
    One way of viewing the world has changed.
    But don’t worry, the work of Steve continues at the top of the world ;o)

  107. Hi Steve, thank you for all the pictures.
    Its not the Kodachromes that speaks, its your pictures.

    I’m thankful to have found your website. As a photographer myself, I could not help but amazed but the depth of emotions in your pictures.

    Thank you once again!

  108. Wonderful images and a fitting end to a great film used by a great photographer like you Steve. Thanks.

  109. Happy new Year!!!
    and thank you for your photos, specially Mr. Guller portrait, one of my favorite photographer.

  110. Such a great tribute to Kodachrome. Really heartfelt images.

  111. […] a Steve McCurry, il quale ha realizzato una serie di 36 immagini (alcune delle quali sono visibili nel suo blog.) McCurry ha scattato la maggior parte dei suoi lavori su Kodachrome, compresa la celeberrima […]

  112. […] Vor vier Tagen stellte Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas seine Arbeit ein. Dwayne’s Photo war “the last Kodak certified Kodachrome processing facility in the world“. Bereits 2009 stellte Kodak die Produktion des Kodachrome-Films ein. Die allerletzte Filmrolle bekam – so erzählt man – der Fotograf Steve McCurry… die letzten Kodachrome Aufnahmen zeigt er auf seinem Blog. […]

  113. […] to the Kansas developer after he finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames on his blog. The final photo, as he stated on CBS’s Sunday Morning program, was of a Civil War cemetery in […]

  114. Steve:

    I spent nearly a decade managing the image library for Galen Rowell. I can’t begin to express what a treat it was to see and care for all of his original kodachrome slides for some of his most famous images. We even had one workshop student I remember who practically frothed at the mouth in worship over the actual transparencies. *Pointing to a slide:* “But it was THIS that the light from the scene was captured on.”

    So many glorious images… I’m delighted to know that it was your privilege to bring this era to a close, and what a fitting final frame it is.

    Cheers!

  115. what a wonderful gift you gave the world, steve! thanks so much for sharing this. have a blessed year 2011

  116. Suzanne Says:

    Absolutely beautiful photos. It’s a sad story. Best wishes to you for the future.

  117. Steve, you have always been one of my heroes! I have 30 rolls of un-opened Kodachrome in my freezer along with about 100 rolls of HEI-35….
    Life has changed, Ansel would be dissapointed……JT

  118. Tom Layman Says:

    I worked for local photo shop (which bit the dust 2 years ago) and I was always stunned when someone brought in a Kodachrome slide for scanning from the early 50s or even 1940s and they looked like they were shot last week. Sic transit gloria Kodachrome.

  119. Steve – What an amazing experience to be able to do this and be that intimately involved with Kodachrome. Your pictures are icons of the photo world. I think you did a beautiful tribute.

    I shot my last three rolls of Kodachrome just this month and just got my film the other day from Dwaynes’ Photo. I bet Kodachrome in 4″x5″ would sell like crazy to niche shooters if it were still made. There is something about looking at those old large format transparencies that is an experience like nothing being shot today.

    Best,

    Forrest MacCormack

  120. jose humberto davila Says:

    FELICIDADES POR SU TRABAJO. ERES UNGENIO DE LA BELLEZA NATURAL DE LA FOTOGRAFIA.SALUDES

  121. george -past afp ny'er Says:

    I agree with Steve’s fondness for the Kodachrome. No other film or sorftware could ever possibly teach more about decisive moments, composure, correct exposure and the patience of getting the right shot and believing in your work, like this film. Digital has leveled the playing field to mediocracy. If you never shot a slide film, you dont know jack.

  122. Bharat Kumar Says:

    happy new year mr. steve..i like ur photography skills very much…i want to become a good photographer too

  123. […] Steve McCurry publica en su blog las fotos que ha hecho con el último rollo de Kodachrome de la his… stevemccurry.wordpress.com/2010/12/30/the-end-of-an-era-1…  por brunilda hace 3 segundos […]

  124. Happy New Year Steve. Thank you for sharing these special images.

    Best regards,
    Arman
    Abu Dhabi

  125. […] McCurry’ye hediye etmişti. Bu son ruloyla çekilen fotoğraflar, halen McCurry’nin bloğunda bulunabiliyor. Fotoğraflar arasında Ara Güler’in de bir portesi […]

  126. […] Utvalgte siste fotografier kan ses hos: Steve McCurry: End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 […]

  127. […] blog di Steve McCurry per alcuni scatti del suo ultimo rullino […]

  128. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog […]

  129. As film user I feel sad looking at decreasing numbers of available films today. Hope Kodak still making these for a long period to enjoy next generations.
    Happy new year everyone!
    best regards from Romania,

  130. Dear Steve,

    Back in the days of yesteryears Kodachrome was photographers dream. I used it (25 asa) to catch the sunlight of a bright summer day and loved it for that. I cursed it when winter came along and I head to settle for 200 asa films……grain like boxing gloves…….no fun at all. I think it was a wise decision of Kodak to send the film to it’s grave……and you did an excellent job carriying it there……the man for the job……maybe Paul Simon should have come to the processing lab and he should have sung his song as the last roll appeared and the machines where turned off neven to awaken again.

    But in all honnesty Steve, would you trade in the comfort of your D3 for the discomfort of an F5, the wait, the agony of knowing that you might or might not have made that all inspiring shot, the agony of waiting untill the film is develloped and you can see the final positives. Digital photography levelled the playing field for all photographers. In the nineteen eighties I could buy say 10 rolls of Kodachrome 25 and 10 rolls of Kodachrome 64 a year and print about 10 pictures on that strange European 30×40 format Cibachrome……and these where never quite what I wanted. Now my harddrive can hold thousands of pictures and a no running cost what soever. And my printer can turn them into great prints in an instant and with DxO I can shoot on any film I like.

    So I suggest bid Kodachrome a fond farewell but lets not remmenis but look on onto a digital future of great photography.

    Greatings, Ed

  131. Deberda gue estan asiendo tremendo trabajo al conpartir esas fotos tan lindas.tan bien megusta retratal pero aun nibel mas basico

  132. […] The End of an Era:1935-2010 (Steve McCurry, shooter of the last Kodachrome roll of film ever made) […]

  133. I shot KR25 and 64 for close to 30 years. 25 and 64 ISO,OMG how did we ever manage to get the film to record an image at all at those rediculously low sensativities ;-)
    I have been a long time admirer of your work and it goes without saying that it was so appropriate for Kodak to give you the honor of receiving the last roll.
    You have done the last rites so well !

    Thanks for the memories
    David

  134. Giorgio Says:

    What a great send off!

  135. […] Il 31 Dicembre del 2010 è stato il giorno in cui “Dwayne’s Photo”, Parsons, Kansas, l’ultimo laboratorio sulla Terra a processare il Kodachrome, ha lavorato l’ultimo set di foto contrassegnato da questo leggendario marchio. Quando Kodak ha interrotto la produzione di questa pellicola, ha inviato a Steve McCurry l’ultimo rullino. Finito di utilizzare tutte le pose, McCurry ha consegnato a mano la pellicola alla “Dwayne’s Photo”. Dentro c’era questo. […]

  136. I shot countless bricks of Kodachrome starting in the 70s. It was the only film that could render what I was envisioning. Thanks for shooting and sharing this last roll, Steve.

  137. […] Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process K… […]

  138. Bobbyw59@yahoo.com Says:

    Stunning photographs, on film and of an era, both of which we will sorely miss. Thanks Steve.

  139. Here is poem my wife and wrote… there is also an audio version I really like:

    Good Night Kodakchrome

    http://figitalrevolution.com/2010/12/30/goodnight-kodachrome-1935-2010-2/

    Cheers- Stephen Schaub
    http://www.figitalrevolution.com

  140. Dear steve. iam an iranian photographer . a member of FIAP.I take my photo with my F4 &

  141. […] carrete son para el George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film. En el blog personal del fotógrafo podéis ver estas fotos. La mayoría son retratos (entre ellos uno de Robert DeNiro) […]

  142. […] Hier, le 30 décembre 2010, le dernier labo photo a arrêté de traiter les pellicules Kodachrome — Il y a un an de ça, Kodak offrait le dernier rouleau fabriqué au photographe Steve McCurry, qui lui dit adieu sur son blog : The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 […]

  143. Dan Jeffus Says:

    Wow end of an era. It will be missed.

  144. […] Valokuvaaja Steve McCarry sai Kodakin tehtaalta viimeisen valmistetun kodakchrome filmirullan. Hän kuvasi ja kehittti sen, loppu tulos täältä. […]

  145. Apparently it’s progress now that the world has gone digital, but you can’t put a price on images like yours.

  146. greatplacetotour.blogspot.com is good

  147. […] “Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome, stops developing the iconic film forever.  When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll.   When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered it to Parsons.   Here are a few of those last 36 frames.” […]

  148. wow amazing picture, and great skill of photography, i wonder kind of camera you use, can you tell me?

  149. Film gives gives out a certain look and feel…I guess these are the last ones we’ll ever see. Thanks for sharing.
    Cheers!

  150. Thank you for the images and the memories. Kodachrome was my dad’s choice, and all my childhood and my sisters’ was permanently captured in its more-than-natural hues. I used it a lot when I did colour, and there was nothing quite like it. Its disappearance surely is a sign of these bleak, grayish times.

  151. […] Kodak ait produit. Il présente une sélection de 9 des 36 photos issues de ce rouleau de pellicule.The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 [Steve McCurry's […]

  152. […] A few images from the last roll of KODACHROME http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com/20…-1935-to-2010/ […]

  153. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 Steve McCurry's Blog Last roll, Last roll developed […]

  154. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry’s Blog. […]

  155. That’s so sad. I used to shoot a lot of Super 8, and it was lovely

  156. […] Steve McCurry, the legendary photographer from the National Geographic got given by Kodak the last roll they produced in 2009. You can see shots from his last roll. […]

  157. Fitting final image for the end of an era. But your other work is stunning, as well.

  158. […] From Mashable: The film was used to take some world-famous photographs, including Steve McCurry’s National Geographic 1985 cover image of a young Afghan girl. Incidentally, Kodak gave McCurry the last roll of Kodachrome last year. The photographer, who hand-delivered the final roll to Parsons after he finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames on his blog. […]

  159. sublime…what a beautiful eye you have…will show to my son, 19, and budding photog…he can’t quite comprehend the beauty of film being of this digital age…bit by bit he’s learning….hope you post the rest of your finale…so many changes in or life time…crazy…thank you for your art and your window into the world.

  160. Gorgeous pictures. You should consider sharing them at Xaxii.

  161. My last 3 exposed rolls were processed yesterday. Several remaining rolls will be sel-processed as b&w for my Kodachome Post-mortem project.

    Thanks for sharing these images.

  162. […] My new year’s wish for those I love is clarity of vision, openness of heart and strength of conviction. and love.                                                                                 Rabari Magician      Today is the day that Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome,  stops developing the iconic film forever.  When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll.   When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons.   Here are a few of those last 36 frames.   … Read More […]

  163. […] Images From The Last Produced Roll Of Kodachrome […]

  164. […] esta mítica película, en Estados Unidos, fue cerrado “dándole el último carrete a Steve McCurry, uno de los fotógrafos que lo convirtió en un icono, el mismo que tomó la también mítica […]

  165. I never had the pleasure of shooting with Kodachrome, but I will miss seeing such nice images like these ones. Thanks for sharing, I’m a great admirer of your work!

  166. […] Le photographe Steve McCurry a eu le privilège de remplir le tout dernier rouleau de Kodachrome. En voici quelques-une […]

  167. […] but always touching and insightful.  Kodak gave him the last roll of kodachrome. Reading his latest post, shot with the world’s last roll of kodachrome to be developed, I don’t think so much […]

  168. Mauricio Moller Says:

    Thanks!

  169. Great images, Kodachrome will be part of photography history.
    Happy new year for every one.

  170. love these! amazing :)

    I love photography would love to get into that business one day!

    thanks so much for sharing this

    it has really made me think

    check out my blog!!

    http://urbanoptimist.wordpress.com/

  171. […] The film has been used to some world-famous photographs, including Steve McCurry’s National Geographic cover in 1985 of a young Afghan girl. By the way, was the last role McCurry Kodak Kodachrome last year. The photographer, who delivered by hand the last role to Parsons after he is finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames in his blog. […]

  172. […] BBC NY Times ABC News Die letzten Fotos von Steve McCurry auf Kodachrome […]

  173. Hello Steve
    As a 17 year old boy, I’ve not yet even scratched the surface of your work. I got myself into the world of photography thanks to my grandfather, who gave me a Canon ftb which had belonged to him and my father. That was just the begining.
    When I heard your work was going to be presented in a museum of my twown, i went to see it the first day.
    My mind got blown away. And since then I’ve been wondering how did you get such rich colors. It`s sad for me to just realize how, when it’s impossible for me or anybody.
    Kodachrome, the best film I never had

  174. Happy New Year’s.
    my photoblog is daily photography of my city in Iran.
    please visited my photoblog and leave comment on pictures. thank’s

  175. I will certainly miss it.
    I knew about it when it was discontinued and decided to get a few rolls just for shooting it. At last, I had the pleasure to learn on this film, as it’s the first slide film I shot.

    “They give us those nice bright colors
    They give us the greens of summers
    Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day…”

    But, today, it’s a dull overcast day in my location.

  176. Hal Smith Says:

    My farewell to Kodachrome was shooting four rolls Wednesday. Two rolls of my one-day old first grandson at Mercy Hospital, Oklahoma City. one of an Oklahoma winter sunset, and one chasing my cats around the house. I overnighted it to Parsons, it arrived 9:02AM making the deadline.

    I hope the grandson takes up the family photography tradition. I rather like the thought that he’ll have slides of himself the day after he arrived on earth shot with Kodachrome one day before it left us.

  177. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog Related Websites […]

  178. Niro get old,Kodachrome disappears and Paul simon didn’t have time to pose!
    Great pictures Steven!

  179. Truly an incredible art form. I will forever treasure the Kodachrome of my Dad. He taught me at the age of seven how to shoot. I can remember patiently waiting the week it took to get the slides back. I am the keeper of all of our Chormatic memories. I treasure them daily.
    Digital will never have what Kodak gave us so long ago.
    Your images are, as always, impeccible Mr. McCurry. Thank you for letting us see a bit of what is now history. I’m truly saddened.

  180. Andrew S. Says:

    I shot several rolls of K25 on a bright Alaskan day in 1981 and those slides remain the most beautiful I’ve taken to date. Nothing digital can compare.

  181. […] Steve McCurry, un des plus talentueux d’entre eux et adepte du Kodachrome, publie un hommage sur son blog et s’était d’ailleurs vu remettre le dernier film fabriqué par Kodak en 2009. Ceux […]

  182. Some great shots in there.

  183. Great photographs from a great master, but I feel a photograph is missing: I feel there should’ve been a self portrait among the group ;-)

    RIP KC, for decades you were a wonderful, enchanting and simply gorgeous companion to countless photo-aficionados. My own slides will be a source of good memories for the rest of my life … and I hope beyond that to those who’ll inherit them.

  184. […] carrete son para el George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film. En el blog personal del fotógrafo podéis ver estas fotos. La mayoría son retratos (entre ellos uno de Robert DeNiro) […]

  185. lovely images…

    well seen, well captured, and well done!

    I enjoy your blog. Keep it coming.

    May the good light be with you!

  186. Thank you for sharing these historic Kodachrome moments. I guess all things must pass, but some are more mourned than others.

  187. Kodachrome did its job wonderfully, but I never jumped on its bandwagon. Far too slow for my uses. After an untold number of rolls of Tri-X, HS Ektachrome, and HS Colour negative films I now am totally digital, and don’t miss all that darkroom work at all. I find it very freeing to be able to dial my “film speed” without having to change rolls (or camera bodies) to suit lighting conditions. Many times I have shot with high speed films when a lower-speed, finer-grained film would have done better just because the camera was always loaded to be ready for “available darkness” shots that would have been impossible with an ASA 25 film. Thjat’s the kind of photography I learned first and it stuck with me. Other approaches are equally valid, of course.

    Your work is wonderful and I hope you find a photographic medium that suits you.

  188. having sold out to digital (mostly) 4 years ago, I feel I have no right to say it but, it is a sad day.

  189. Love to see how you arrange the picture with the theme you wrote here!

    Thanks for sharing Steve

  190. Stephenie Blakemore Says:

    A sad day, although maybe better for our increasingly fragile environment. (Making and Developing Kodachrome was not without its price to our environment). Kodachrome 25 was truly my favorite film. Think of all the memories that have been captured over its 75 years in existence. Hope that many images shot on Kodachrome have been properly archived. Thank you for your many years of wonderful Kodachrome photographs.

  191. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 « Steve McCurry's Blog […]

  192. […] Kodachrome producido, el cual reveló en Parsons, Kansas; las imágenes están publicadas en su blog, 36 cuadros para despedir las bondades de una película que ha educado nuestra apreciación […]

  193. Thank you so much for posting your pictures of the last Kodachrome in the world. I cry every time I look at these photos ’cause this is the last that I will ever see such beautiful pictures on film. Thank you so much, I really mean it.

  194. My sentiments exactly…Kr 25 –slow as it was –infinitely
    RICHER in detail and possibilities than Kr 64 . Not to
    downgrade Kr64 which was a GREAT film. Too bad the
    processing was so involved -expensive [to do ] and so
    slow. Perhaps someone with a love of the technology
    will endeavour to do the commercial LAB -thing–much
    as Polaroid [Belgium ?] has arrisen from the ashes–as a
    Phoenix – Here’s hoping………………

  195. justkristine Says:

    There are several shoe boxes full of Kodachrome images in our basement. They are how I remember my childhood. As a photographer and art major I am sad that this day came, and even sadder that in my relatively short lifetime I was only able to use the film a handful of times.
    Thank you for sharing Steve. Truly.

  196. Wanda Doerner Says:

    Thanks for the nostalgic post – Steve. I miss shooting film … my favorite choices were Agfacolor (ASA 100), Fuji Professional Portrait film (ASA 160) and of course – Kodachrome 25 and 64. Digital images give us immediate turnaround – but film always yields those magically vibrant epic looks that take enormous time to recreate in post. Now what to do with all of those film cameras?

  197. […] the final roll to Parsons after he finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames on his blogblog.Meanwhile, as the Times noted, the last roll to be processed at Dwayne’s Photo belongs to […]

  198. […] Kodachrome producido, el cual reveló en Parsons, Kansas; las imágenes están publicadas en su blog, 36 cuadros para despedir las bondades de una película que educado nuestra apreciación […]

  199. […] The film was used to take some world-famous photographs, including Steve McCurry’s National Geographic 1985 cover image of a young Afghan girl. Incidentally, Kodak gave McCurry the last roll of Kodachrome last year. The photographer, who hand-delivered the final roll to Parsons after he finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames on his blog. […]

  200. Thank you Steve, for sharing your images with the world. I shot my first roll of Kodachrome when I was just 12, now, 44 years later seeing this film disappear from the scene is like losing an old friend. Client photos, images for myself, shot on film…digital is great, and not wanting to go the way of the dinosaurs, of course, I made the swith. But, there is something magical about film that digital will never replace. Kodachrome, gone but never forgotten!

  201. hi steve – what a treat – can’t wait to see the other 33 shots!
    Happy New Year!
    xoxo
    Marcy

  202. […] Deja un Comentario »                                                                                 Rabari Magician      Today is the day that Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome,  stops developing the iconic film forever.  When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll.   When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons.   Here are a few of those last 36 frames.   … Read More […]

  203. In each of these photographs, as in every other one as well, there is a gift from the film that photographers have counted on and hoped for these last 150 years or so. Thank you for the magic.

    Please continue to buy and shoot film, and keep the magic alive.

  204. […] the final roll to Parsons after he finished shooting, has posted some of the last 36 frames on his blog.Meanwhile, as the Times noted, the last roll to be processed at Dwayne’s Photo belongs to […]

  205. Marc Baptista Says:

    Nostalgia, and a passage of time. Not all chang is good, however, we must move on

  206. William Todd Says:

    The emulsion looks wonderful as it always has done. I shot my first ever serious photos on Kodachrome 25 which remains my favorite stock of all time. What a shame it all had to end.

  207. […] Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome,  stops developing the iconic film forever. When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll.   When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons.  Here are a few of those last 36 frames. […]

  208. […] – Steve McCurry’s Posted: December 31, 2010 by ExSubSpy in Uncategorized 0 via stevemccurry.wordpress.com LikeBe the first to like this […]

  209. Mike Gamer Says:

    Steve, you are undoubtedly one of the finest Kodachrome photographers and rightfully deserved the “last roll” honour.

    Nice shots (as always)

  210. […] The last picture ever shot and developed on Kodachrome – and his blog with other images from the last roll. […]

  211. […] Despite its use in many iconic photographs, including Steve McCurry’s National Geographic 1985 cover image, many photographers have traded in for newer films or digital cameras. According to Mashable, Kodak actually gave McCurry the last roll of Kodachrome film last year, and he has since posted the pictures he took to his blog. […]

  212. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010                                                              […] […]

  213. I would have been taken one photograph of yours too … :)

  214. Thank you for sharing these, Steve. Something I find amazing is how the film turns back the clock. These photos could have been shot two decades ago, just based on the look of them. They are timeless, just like the film.

  215. Rarely use film anymore. Still nice to have a choice.

  216. Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome” cut & paste this YouTube link:

    Just sit back and cry for the Good Ole Days… RIP KR64

  217. Cliff Mark Says:

    Delightful shadows and contrasts, thank you for sharing these with us.
    Au Revoir Kodachrome.

  218. My apologies, I forgot to include the link to the site of my saying goodby to Kodachrome in my previous post. Here is that link:

    http://www.riffspics.com/2010/12/color-of-winter_27.html

    Sorry & thanks for allowing this follow-up…

    Glenn

  219. […] The End of an Era – 1935 to 2010 Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome, stops developing the iconic film forever. posted under Photography […]

  220. Cliff Mark Says:

    Delightful shadows and contrasts, thank you for sharing these with us.
    Au Revoir Kodachrome…

  221. RIP KM. Like first commenter I changed to RVP long time ago and last year on the one occasion I needed one found it hard enough to locate a lab in the UK that would run plain E6. (Bayeux in London filled the gap superbly). But I’m commenting here to lament the lack of choice.

  222. Been following you for quite awhile now and I love your photographs. Kodachrome was what I used most, when I wanted slides and not film, back during my film days. When I switched to digital I wanted to go back but never did.

    In honor of Kodachrome this was a post I did on Riff’s Photography Journal as a way of saying goodby to Kodachrome. Yeah, and I have a take off on the song “Kodachrome” as well. Only this time Mommy takes it away… :-)

    Love your work Steve, keep it up, and these last of an era are great…
    Thanks.
    Glenn

  223. Wow, end of an era! Thanks for sharing…..have a wonderful 2011 :)

  224. […] McCurry (si no saben quien es recordaran su foto de la niña afghana) para que lo usara (el mismo lo comenta en su blog) […]

  225. […] follow up to the Kodachrome story I posted earlier. Here’s a selection of some of the final shots ever taken on the iconic film. The Artist says: Today is the day that Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the […]

  226. Andrew Kirkby Says:

    The last photo is very fitting. The red & yellow flowers have that iconic, iridescent Kodachrome glow even on this old and dodgy computer monitor.

    Thanks Steve, Vale Kodachrome

  227. You have been my favorite travel photographer since I saw the NatGeo cover w/ the Afghan Girl as a youngin’. I have that issue and the anniversary issue of it, framed. I saw you speak in February. I can think of no one more appropriate to photograph the last roll of Kodachrome film. I’m glad it was you, and love the images you captured. Still sad to see this era end. But happy you saw it out in style, if it had to go away.

  228. Steve – just great photos as usual but still just great ! sad indeed, and they say that is progress ? We got to use and see it so that was nice.

    Happy New Year, keep up the beautiful work (and the blog)

    Mack Ray

  229. Thanks Steve; great work!

  230. It’s a sad day. I also used Kodachrome as when i photograph China in 1979. Later on I changed to Fuji Velvia 50 ISO, a great film also.
    A sad day was also when Sygma, Gamma and Sipa closed. And Cover in Spain. Fortunately we still have Magnum.
    But that’s the way it goes.

  231. Sanjeev Raman Says:

    I shot Kodachrome (as an amateur/ hobbyist, of course), and used Dwayne’s Photo Lab services many times. I’m 34 and got interested in photography about 8 years ago, at a time when film photography was already experiencing its painful demise. I held out against digital technology until a few months ago since I was never convinced (and still don’t believe) that it could stand up to the drama of transparency films like Kodachrome or Velvia 50.
    I recently made the switch to digital, and while I enjoy it, I agree that it’s just not the same as holding a slide of Velvia or Kodachrome in your hand and watching the colors pop as you scan it with a loupe on a light box.
    Thank you for your spellbinding work for NG and other organizations. It is truly inspiring, and something that people like me can only dream to aspire. We will miss Kodachrome dearly.

    Cheers,

    Sanjeev from Utah

  232. […] Eu acrescentaria que, inexoravelmente, um ano novo só pode nascer quando outro acaba… Esta é a vida!                                                                                 Rabari Magician      Today is the day that Dwayne's Photo in Parsons, Kansas, the last lab on the planet to process Kodachrome,  stops developing the iconic film forever.  When Kodak stopped producing the film last year, they gave me the last roll.   When I finished shooting the final frames, I hand-delivered  it to Parsons.   Here are a few of those last 36 frames.   … Read More […]

  233. As an admirer of your work (and Kodachrome!), but late finding your blog… it would be very helpful if you’d include better navigation. A dated section would be fantastic, and make it easier to follow/bookmark/share your posts.
    Thanks!

  234. Thanks Steve for these wonderful shots. What now? All best to you for the New Year. Peace, love and blessings, Rita

  235. End of an era,but it’s legacy will continue…

  236. All this is really really sad. Very good jobs Steve, as always!

  237. what an honor to find these photos and words in my email this morning. thank you for sharing with the public such beautiful photos and the passing of an era with kodachrome – momma don’t take my kodachrome away….

  238. Laura Reitz Says:

    9 of 36…more! please.

  239. DPB_Blogger Says:

    It will be missed. Maybe its in my head but it seems I can tell the difference between film and digital. Im still going to be using film and analog photography for personal projects. Still prefer it over digital.

  240. Steve :) You are gr8….

  241. michele reiner Says:

    Your photos are brilliant. What film will you use now?
    Can you find any way to shoot digital that looks close to Kodachrome?
    Do you ever shoot digital?

    Thanks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28,990 other followers

%d bloggers like this: