Archive for children

Children of the Omo

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2014 by stevemccurry

ETHIOPIA-10227Surma tribe, Omo Valley, Ethiopia

The Omo River Valley is located in Southwest Ethiopia.
It has been called “the last frontier” in Africa. 

ETHIOPIA-10341NF (1)Kara tribe

There are nine main tribes that occupy the Omo River Valley,
with a population of approximately 225,000 tribal peoples. 

The majority of the people living in the Omo River Valley
live without clean drinking water and without medical care.

ETHIOPIA-10060Surma tribe

It has been a privilege to go back to the Omo Valley in Ethiopia
with my friend, John Rowe, to photograph 
the work he is doing with Lale Labuko
in their mission to end the practice of mingi and to house 
and
shelter the mingi children who have already been rescued.

ETHIOPIA-10105Lale Labuko

Lale,  a 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorer, 
learned about the practice of Mingi and made it his life’s
mission to end ritual infanticide in his tribe’s culture.

http://omochild.org/videos/lale-labukos-story

ETHIOPIA-10306Surma tribe

Mingi is the ritualistic killing of infants and children who are Mingi 
because they are considered impure or cursed.
A child can be mingi for many reasons, 
but once they are mingi they are
left alone in the desert without food and water or drowned in a river.

ETHIOPIA-10039John Rowe and Friends

I met John in Burma. He is a photographer and
successful businessman 
who has founded companies
which develop software for digital media and the entertainment
industry.  
He has also devoted a tremendous amount of time, energy, and
financial assistance to the work of Omo Child.

ETHIOPIA-10248NFKara tribe

ETHIOPIA-10247Kara tribe

The hope is that the rescued children will be future leaders in their communities and
will help raise awareness to help advocate the ending of the tribal practice of mingi.

ETHIOPIA-10277Hamer tribe

To learn more about Lale and John and OmoChild, please visit:
http://omochild.org/

ETHIOPIA-10153Kara tribe

ETHIOPIA-10331Surma tribe

ETHIOPIA-10281NFSurma tribe

ETHIOPIA-10243Surma tribe

ETHIOPIA-10221Surma tribe

ETHIOPIA-10235Surma tribe

BIO-10518NFSteve McCurry with members of the Surma tribe

ETHIOPIA-10151NFKara tribe

ETHIOPIA-10136 (1)Kara Tribe

ETHIOPIA-10152

The Most Dangerous Place to be Born

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2011 by stevemccurry

AFGHN-13507NF

  Afghanistan is the worst place to be a child.
-UNICEF

AFGHN-12895NF2

As politicians, pundits, and diplomats endlessly debate the future of the world’s involvement in Afghanistan, it seems wise to reflect on the  innocents of Afghanistan over the decades of invasions, insurgencies, civil wars, and abject poverty. 

AFGHN-13497

 “Afghanistan today is without doubt the most dangerous place on earth to be born.”
– Daniel Toole, UNICEF, Regional Director for South Asia

AFGHN-13517

 The burden of wars, poverty, instability, and insurgencies has always been borne disproportionately by children.  They are killed and maimed by landmines and other explosives.   Schools are being destroyed by the Taliban, and girls who seek an education are often threatened and attacked.   Children are recruited by the Taliban to be suicide bombers and smugglers.

AFGHN-13003NF

AFGHN-13447

 No one growing up in Afghanistan has ever known what it is like to live in a country at peace.

AFGHN-13513

AFGHN-13509

AFGHN-12097ns

These pictures are hard to look at, but much harder for the parents
to look at their children who are severely injured physically, emotionally, and psychologically.

AFGHN-10060

AFGHN-13412NF

 A UNICEF-supported study found that the majority of children under 16 years in Kabul suffer from psychological trauma. 

PAKISTAN-10094

During the ten years the Soviets were in Afghanistan, they killed one million Afghans.  Five million became refugees.

PAKISTAN-10016NF2

UNICEF, the UN children’s agency, says that Afghanistan is the worst place in the world to be a child. One in five children do not live past the age of five.  Most of those deaths are caused by curable childhood diseases and malnutrition, compounded by the security situation, which means that parents are unable to access proper health care.

 AFGHN-12243

It is estimated that at least 30% of children from five to fourteen work to help their families survive.  Many weave rugs and work at factories making bricks.

AFGHN-13503

AFGHN-10211

00299_01, Kabul, Afghanistan, 2002, AFGHN-12432. A water vendor poses.

“It is very difficult to put a hard and fast figure to the number of children dying from hypothermia alone on Kabul’s streets as there would undoubtedly be other reasons that would make them sick or vulnerable in the first place,” UNICEF regional communications chief Sarah Crowe wrote.

AFGHN-12157

 “Extreme poverty, having lost a parent, being trafficked or displaced, or many other reasons may have forced them on to the streets where they would be deprived of their most basic needs (decent food, health, immunization, protection) and exposed to the extreme cold of Afghan winters.”

AFGHN-12344NF

“There are a lot of children in Afghanistan, but little childhood.”
– Khaled Hosseini,  The Kite Runner

Children at Work

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 1, 2009 by stevemccurry

In developing countries one in six children from 5 to 14 years old is involved in child labor.

NEPAL-10045

Nepal, 1983

In the least developed countries, 30 percent of all children are engaged in child labor.

AFGHN-12812

Boy working in candy factory, Kabul, 2006

Worldwide, 126 million children work in hazardous conditions, often enduring beatings, humiliation and sexual violence by their employers.

PHILIPPINES-10017

An eleven-year-old boy working in gold mine, Mindinao, Philippines, 1985

An estimated 1.2 million children — both boys and girls — are trafficked each year into exploitative work in agriculture, mining, factories, armed conflict or commercial sex work.

TIBET-10705

Tibetan Girl, 2002

 

AFGHN-10039NF2

Children work in an opium field in Badakhshan, Afghanistan. 1982

The highest proportion of child laborers is in sub-Saharan Africa, where 26 percent of children (49 million) are involved in work.

AFRICA-10054NF

Niger, 1995

INDIA-10680NF

Boy sells flowers in busy road, India 1993

INDIA-10207NF

Young Welder, Bombay, India, 1994

“Child labor and poverty are inevitably bound together,  and if you continue to use the labor of children as the treatment for the social disease of poverty, you will have both poverty and child labor to the end of time.” -  Grace Abbott

Sources: http://www.unicef.org, http://www.ilo.org, www.crin.org

Children of War

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on November 13, 2009 by stevemccurry

Every gun that is fired, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. The world in arms is not spending money alone.

“It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children.” — Dwight D. Eisenhower

AFGHN-10083

AFGHN-10083, Afghanistan, 1992

AFGHN-10224

Kabul, Afghanistan, 1993

philippines-10023

Luzon, Philippines, 1986

LEBANON-10001

Beirut, Lebanon, 1982

KUWAIT-10042chidlreninwar

Kuwait City, 1991

AFGHN-10060

A landmine victim, Pul i Khumri, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, 1992

KUWAIT-10021-NS

Shepherd boy at Al Ahmadi, Kuwait, 1991

AFGHN-10118

Kandahar, Afghanistan, 1985

AFGHN-10158

Child with Dutch Soldier, Afghanistan, 2002

SRILANKA-10026

Tamil Tigers recruits during training, west of Batticola, Sri Lanka, 199

AFGHN-12895NF

Kabul, Afghanistan, 1992

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 28,998 other followers