Archive for khmer rouge

Language of Looking

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 10, 2011 by stevemccurry

Please scroll to the bottom for the unseen portrait of the week. 

 There are many ways to describe the ways that people look at each other and the world.  We peek, stare, glance, gaze, gape, glare, and peer.  We also examine, contemplate, squint, and observe.

 

 INDIA-10216Jodhpur, India

BURMA-10151Yangon, Myanmar/Burma

GERMANY-10061 Berlin, Germany

The question is not what you look at, but what you see. 
 – Henry David Thoreau 

YUGOSLAVIA-10069Croatia

AFGHN-13002Kabul, Afghanistan

AFGHN-13295Afghanistan

AFGHN-12691NFnsKabul, Afghanistan

INDIA-10731Thirumullaivayil, India

One of the most wonderful things in nature is a glance of the eye; it transcends speech; it is the bodily
symbol of identity. 

- Ralph Waldo Emerson 

INDIA-10757Train to Peshawar, Pakistan

BURMA-10394NF5Myanmar/Burma

PARAGUAY-10030Paraguay

TIBET-10303NFBarkhor Quarter, Lhasa, Tibet

It’s the way to educate your eyes.  Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop.  Die knowing something.  You are not here long.
– Walker Evans  

SPAIN-10020Reina Sofia, National Museum of Art, Madrid, Spain

If you look at a thing 999 times, you are perfectly safe; if you look at it for the 1000th time,
you are in danger of seeing it for the first time.
–  G. K. Chesterton 

INDIA-11085Jaipur, India

I used to try to figure out precisely what I was seeing all the time, until I discovered I didn’t need to.
If the thing is there, why, there it is.
– Walker Evans

CAMBODIA-10311A man examines photographs of victims of the Khmer Rouge’s S-21 prison camp, Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

 Unseen Portrait of the WeekPAKISTAN-10011Baluchistan, Pakistan

Fathers

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2010 by stevemccurry
HONDURAS-10001-(2)

Honduras

 

INDIA-10678

Rajasthan, India

 

THAILAND-10048

Cambodian refugees fleeing from the Khmer Rouge

 

LATIN_AMERICA-10002

La Esperanza, Colombia


“It is a wise father that knows his own child.” –  William Shakespeare

INDIA-10210NF

India


AFGHN-10098NF1

Helmand Province, Afghanistan

 

“A Man knows that he is growing old  because he begins to look like his father.”
- Gabriel Garcia Marquez

INDIA-11002-(1)

Wedding, Rajasthan, India


INDIA-10327

West Bengal, India

 

“I cannot think of any need in childhood as strong as the need for a father’s protection.”
- Sigmund Freud

KASHMIR-10015-(1)

Srinagar, Kashmir, India

 

“One father is more than a hundred Schoolmasters.”
- George Herbert

PARAGUAY-10016

Paraguay

 

“My father didn’t tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.”
- Clarence Budington Kelland

Dedicated to my father, Eugene T. McCurry

Dith Pran – Out of the Killing Fields

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2009 by stevemccurry

dith pran and camera

I went to Cambodia in 1986, on an assignment given to me by Kathy Ryan of the New York Times Sunday magazine to photograph Dith Pran and Haing Ngor.

My assignment coincided with Diane Sawyer who was doing an ABC news piece on Dith Pran and Haing Ngor returning to Cambodia after filming the movie “The Kiling Fields.” It was the first time Pran had returned to his country, and it was still a bit dangerous because there were still Khmer Rouge in the countryside.

Pran grew up near Angkor Wat and as a young man had been a tour guide, when he met Sidney Schanberg, the New York Times reporter, whom he worked for as a translator and fixer.

Schanberg was eventually forced to leave the country, but while he won a Pulitzer for his coverage, Pran became a virtual slave of the Khmer Rouge in a death camp. Dith Pran watched the country descend into the hell known as the killing fields, but was able to survive from 1975 until 1979 during the time when a third of the population was killed. Pran later said, “Only the silent survived.”

Eventually Schanberg found Pran in a refugee camp and brought him back to New York and helped him to immigrate to the United States where Pran became a photographer for the New York Times.

Pran and I became friends after our time in Cambodia so after he retired from the New York Times, we returned to Siem Reap. It was moving to be with him as he returned to his country and revisited his family. While there, we visited nearby Angkor Wat. I was so struck at the magnificence of this temple complex, I planned to come back and photograph it as soon as I had the opportunity. Years later, I went back and photographed Angkor Wat on assignment for National Geographic.

Haing Ngor, who played Pran in the movie, “The Killing Fields,” won an Oscar for his role. Tragically, Ngor who was a doctor in real life, was murdered in Los Angeles during a robbery.

Pran and old friend

Pran and pictures on wall

Dith and Haing

Pran and Schanberg

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 26,510 other followers