Archive for Sahel

Sentinels and Sanctuaries

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 10, 2013 by stevemccurry

CAMBODIA-10290Angkor Wat Temple Complex, Cambodia

Trees are Sentinels
Guarding, Nurturing, Protecting
Bastions of Dignity

Breathing life
Providing shelter
Asking for nothing
Sacrificing everything
– K. Earle

_SM11420, Chiang-Mai, Thailand, 2011, THAILAND-10087Chiang Mai, Thailand

INDIA-10710Darjeeling, India

Trees are sanctuaries.
Whoever knows how to speak to them,
whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth.
They do not preach learning and precepts,
they preach undeterred by particulars, the ancient law of life.
– Hermann Hesse, Wandering

CAMBODIA-10032 (1)Caretaker at Ta Prohm temple, Angkor, Cambodia

For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers.
Nothing is holier, nothing is more exemplary than a beautiful, strong tree. 
- H. Hesse, ibid

FRANCE-10126Paris, France

If you would know strength and patience,
welcome the company of trees.  
- Hal Borland

ETHIOPIA-10048NFEthiopia

ITALY-10486, Camino, Italy, 2004. A woman hikes through a forest.Italy

It is not so much for its beauty that the forest makes a
claim upon men’s hearts, as for that subtle something,
that quality of air that emanation from old trees,
that so wonderfully changes and renews a weary spirit.
-  Robert Louis Stevenson

KASHMIR-10055Kashmir

I hear the wind among the trees
Playing the celestial symphonies;
I see the branches downward bent,
Like keys of some great instrument.
- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

CAMBODIA-10211Cambodia


ETHIOPIA-10143Ethiopia

I never saw a discontented tree.
They grip the ground as though they liked it, and
though fast rooted they travel about as far as we do.
They go wandering forth in all directions with every wind,
going and coming like ourselves,
traveling with us around the
sun two million miles a day,
and through space heaven knows how
fast and far!
-  John Muir

MOROCCO-10072Morocco

THAILAND-10008NFAyutthaya, Thailand

AFRICA-10237The Sahel, Africa

Planting trees early in spring,
we make a place for birds to sing in time to come.
How do we know? They are singing here now.
There is no other guarantee that singing will ever be.
- Wendell Berry

00547_09. Monsoons, Nepal, 1983, 08/1983. A young boy works on a mountainside.Nepal

No wonder the hills and groves were God’s first temples…
- John Muir

ITALY-10020Italy

INDIA-10855Agra, India

KOREA-10010South Korea

Trees, proud standing people
stretching fingertips to the sky, reaching, praying
glorious attention, breathing light.
strength
shelter
timeless confidence
bending and firm
comforting …
-  Wallace Stevens  

THAILAND-10034Thailand


Current Gallery Exhibitions

Peter Fetterman Gallery in Santa Monica, California
Cavalier Gallery, Nantucket, Massachusetts
Fifty One Fine Art Photography in Antwerp, Belgium

 Current Museum Exhibitions
 Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg, Germany
Santa Maria della Scala Siena, Italy

Children at Work

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 6, 2011 by stevemccurry

AFRICA-10237The Sahel, Africa

In developing countries one in six children from 5 to 14 years old is involved in child labor.

INDIA-10207Ship-breaking yard, Mumbai, India

Shoepolisher, Tibetans, 12/2000, final book_iconicLhasa, Tibet

In the least developed countries, 30 percent of all children are engaged in child labor.

Marpha, Nepal, 1998Marpha, Nepal

Worldwide, 126 million children work in hazardous conditions, often enduring beatings, humiliation and sexual violence by their employers.

AFGHN-13034NFKabul, Afghanistan

The highest proportion of child laborers is in sub-Saharan Africa, where 26 percent of children (49 million) are involved in work.

AFGHN-12489
Kabul, Afghanistan

AFGHN-13002Kabul, Afghanistan

AFGHN-12258-(1)Kandahar, Afghanistan

An estimated 1.2 million children — both boys and girls — are trafficked each year into exploitative work in agriculture, mining, factories, armed conflict or commercial sex work.

_SM13419, Myanmar, Burma, 02/2011, BURMA-10283Mandalay, Myanmar/ Burma

AFGHN-10025Kabul, Afghanistan

AFGHN-12925Bamiyan, Afghanistan 

“Child labor and poverty are inevitably bound together,  and if you continue to use the labor of children as the treatment for the social disease of poverty, you will have both poverty and child labor to the end of time.” -  Grace Abbott

 

AFGHN-12209Pul i Khumri, Afghanistan

Cigarette Vendor, Kabul Survey Trip, 05/2002 Kabul, Afghanistan

AFGHN-12243Pul i Khumri, Afghanistan

Charikar, Afghanistan, 2002

 ImagineAsia’s Storybook Project for Afghan Children

The mission of ImagineAsia, a 501c3 non-profit organization, is to work in partnership with local community leaders and regional NGO’s to help students in Afghan communities receive fundamental educational materials and resources. 

IA  has started to translate Aesop’s fables into Dari for the children of Afghanistan who have never had a book of their own.  Translated and illustrated by volunteers, these stories will reach families in remote areas of the country.

For thousands of years the fables have revealed universal truths through simple allegories.  The stories often use animals to  teach lessons that are easily understood by people of all ages.

Here are some sample pages:

The Lion and the Mouse –  illustrated by Jason Melcher

 The Boy Who Cried Wolf – illustrated by Kate Raines

Pitcher and the Crow –  illustrated by Lois Andersen

An Afghan Folktale – The Silver on the Hearth – illustrated by Kate Harrold

Tortoise and Hare –  illustrated by Kate Harrold


The Donkey and its Purchaser – illustrated by Kate Harrold

The Sun and the Wind – illustrated by Annie Zimmerman

 The Fox and the Goat – illustrated by Jason Melcher

 http://www.imagine-asia.org/

Sources: http://www.unicef.org, http://www.ilo.org, www.crin.org

G O A L – Football Fever

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2010 by stevemccurry

BURMA-10003

Sitwe, Burma, 1996

 

Whether you say futbol, futebol, voetbal, soccer, футбол, or calcio, you already know that football is the most popular sport on the planet.  This World Cup Tournament final match will be the most-watched event in television history.

BURMA-10206

Burma, 2010


More than simply kicking a ball around, football stirs passions, and crosses every boundary of nationality, race, class, generations, and religion.

BURMA-10153

Burma, 1984

 

TURKEY-10035

Istanbul, Turkey, 1998


YEMEN-10070

Yemen, 1999

 

AFGHN-12082

Herat, Afghanistan, 2003 

 

Football is played in every corner of the globe by every child who sees a moving ball and kicks it.

MALI-10054

The Sahel, Africa, 1986

 

MOROCCO-10010

Morocco, 1998

 

“Some people say football is a matter of life and death.  I assure you, it’s much more important than that.” -Bill Shankley

BANGLADESH-10006

Bangladesh, 1983

Occupational Hazards

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2009 by stevemccurry

magazine-scan crop2

photo by Borut Sraj

One of the scariest experiences I’ve had in my career was crashing into a frigid glacial lake in the former Yugoslavia while on assignment for National Geographic.

EUROPE-10013_for-blog

A twilight moon rises above the Kamniske mountains and Slovenia’s Sava River Valley, Slovenia.

I had hired a small, ultra-light, two-seater airplane in to do aerials over Bled Lake in Slovenia. The pilot flew down to the surface of the lake, very, very close — in fact so close that I told him to go up because we were only about five feet from the water.  If I had wanted to be that close I could have hired a boat, but it was too late. The wheels got caught in the water and we couldn’t pull out. We went down and as soon as the fuselage and the propeller hit the water, the propeller blew apart.

EUROPE-10011

Rijeka, Croatia, 1989

We flipped upside down in the 40-degree water in the middle of February and immediately began to sink. The cockpit was not enclosed. The seatbelt was a jerry-rigged homemade device and I hadn’t studied it and couldn’t get it off me.

I realized I was going to die. I guess that part of your brain concerned with self-preservation kicked in, and I slid underneath the contraption, literally went underneath, and was able to swim to the surface. The pilot made it, but didn’t attempt to help me.  My passport and equipment went to the bottom. Fortunately the pilot and I were picked up by a fisherman within ten minutes. Days later the plane was raised but all of my equipment is still 60 feet down.

magazine-scan crop1

Picture of me in Lubiana before going to Lake Bled where my plane crashed.

There was another airplane incident in Africa.  Again, I was on assignment photographing the Sahel, that band of land that separates the Sahara Desert from the grasslands of the Savannah.

We got lost flying from Timbuktu in Mali back to the capital of Bamako. We had left in a sandstorm and started flying along the Niger River. I guess the pilot’s navigational instruments weren’t working. He literally could not find his way back to the capital.

 

CHAD-10005

Chari River in the Sahel region near N’Djamena, Chad.

I watched him circling and I started to wonder what was going on.   He came back down through the clouds. It was getting dark and there was a huge thunderstorm right in our path.  The pilot dropped the small craft to search for his bearings.

Fuel was getting low, and we could never make it back to Timbuktu.  To the south, an enormous black wall of clouds loomed from the horizon – a monsoon storm.  In vain, for a half an hour we scanned the landscape searching for an opening.  We had no radio contact, and and no navigational equipment.  We prepared our last thoughts.

Finally, the pilot spotted a millet field, agonizingly small, but flat.  As we thundered in, I watched the wheel of the plane miss a six-foot hole by a few steps.

MALI PLANE

Muddy field, Mali

We shuddered to a stop with a few hard bounces.  Villagers ran out from the surrounding bush in wonderment as the sky opened up.   We slept on the plane that night, and finally found a vehicle to take us back to the capital city of Bamako, fourteen hours of bone-rattling roads.

AFRICA-10037

Niger River, Mali

 

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