Archive for slovenia

It Takes Two

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 12, 2012 by stevemccurry

 Here are some pictures of couples all over
the world who have a relationship that is
evident in their gestures of caring, their body
language, their eyes.

MAURITANIA-10013

Mauritania

If we are a metaphor of the universe,
the human couple is the metaphor par excellence,
the point of intersection of all forces and the seed of all forms.
The couple is time recaptured, the return to the time before time.
– Octavio Paz, Mexico, Nobel Laureate in Literature

CUBA-10023

Havana, Cuba


BRAZIL-10013NF5

Brazil

A4487718, THAILAND-10041NF, Chiang Mai

Chiang Mai, Thailand


ITALY-10067

Venice, Italy

What is essential is invisible to the eye.
 - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

ITALY-10060

Rome, Italy

Grow old along with me.
The best is yet to be, the last of life,
for which the first was made.
Our times are in his hand who saith,
A whole I planned, youth shows but half;
Trust God: See all, nor be afraid!
– Robert Browning

FRANCE-10056

France

 

USA-10394

New York City


AFGHN-13082NF

Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan

Life has taught us that love does not
consist in gazing at each other but in looking outward
together in the same direction.
-Antoine de Saint-Exupéry,
Wind, Sand, and Stars

TIBET-10119

Tagong, Tibet

Take away love and our earth is a tomb.
– Robert Browning

YUGOSLAVIA-10057

Gostivar, Macedonia

 

INDIA-10313

Agra, India

The heart has its reasons that reason knows nothing of. 
- Blaise Pascal, Pensées, 1670

UGANDA-10002

Uganda

To love someone deeply gives you strength.
Being loved by someone  deeply gives you courage.
– Lao-Tzu

YEMEN-10046

Sanaa, Yemen

 

IRELAND-10010

Dublin, Ireland

 

YUGOSLAVIA-10063

Belgrade, Serbia

One word frees us of all the weight and pain in life.
That word is love.
– Sophocles

ITALY-10085

Rome, Italy

 

TURKEY-10022

Istanbul, Turkey

CAMBODIA-10085

Cambodia

 

ITALY-10268NF

Rome, Italy

The couple is time recaptured, the return to the time before time.
– Octavio Paz, Mexico, Nobel Laureate in Literature

The Power of Two

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 13, 2010 by stevemccurry

I have always been interested in the ways that people around the world share things in common.  All of those things remind us of what the human condition is really about.  In the blogs that I wrote about reading, we saw that there is a strong connection between people and their books which is the same in Yemen as it is in China as it is in France as it is in Thailand as any other place on the planet.  The relationship between people and their books goes all the way back to the invention of the printing press.

The subject of this blog goes back millennia.  Here are some pictures of couples who have a relationship that is evident in their gestures of caring, their body language, in their eyes.

VIETNAM-10024

Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam

 

AFGHN-13082NF

Bamiyan Province, Afghanistan

 

TIBET-10119

Tagong, Kham, Tibet

 

YUGOSLAVIA-10057

Gostivar, Macedonia

 

INDIA-10313

Agra, India

MAURITANIA-10013

Nouakchott, Mauritania

 

FRANCE-10056

Lourdes, France

 

UGANDA-10002

Kampala, Uganda

 

YEMEN-10046

Sanaa, Yemen

 

IRELAND-10010

After the ball, Dublin, Ireland

 

YUGOSLAVIA-10061

Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

YUGOSLAVIA-10063

Belgrade, Serbia

 

Occupational Hazards

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2009 by stevemccurry

magazine-scan crop2

photo by Borut Sraj

One of the scariest experiences I’ve had in my career was crashing into a frigid glacial lake in the former Yugoslavia while on assignment for National Geographic.

EUROPE-10013_for-blog

A twilight moon rises above the Kamniske mountains and Slovenia’s Sava River Valley, Slovenia.

I had hired a small, ultra-light, two-seater airplane in to do aerials over Bled Lake in Slovenia. The pilot flew down to the surface of the lake, very, very close — in fact so close that I told him to go up because we were only about five feet from the water.  If I had wanted to be that close I could have hired a boat, but it was too late. The wheels got caught in the water and we couldn’t pull out. We went down and as soon as the fuselage and the propeller hit the water, the propeller blew apart.

EUROPE-10011

Rijeka, Croatia, 1989

We flipped upside down in the 40-degree water in the middle of February and immediately began to sink. The cockpit was not enclosed. The seatbelt was a jerry-rigged homemade device and I hadn’t studied it and couldn’t get it off me.

I realized I was going to die. I guess that part of your brain concerned with self-preservation kicked in, and I slid underneath the contraption, literally went underneath, and was able to swim to the surface. The pilot made it, but didn’t attempt to help me.  My passport and equipment went to the bottom. Fortunately the pilot and I were picked up by a fisherman within ten minutes. Days later the plane was raised but all of my equipment is still 60 feet down.

magazine-scan crop1

Picture of me in Lubiana before going to Lake Bled where my plane crashed.

There was another airplane incident in Africa.  Again, I was on assignment photographing the Sahel, that band of land that separates the Sahara Desert from the grasslands of the Savannah.

We got lost flying from Timbuktu in Mali back to the capital of Bamako. We had left in a sandstorm and started flying along the Niger River. I guess the pilot’s navigational instruments weren’t working. He literally could not find his way back to the capital.

 

CHAD-10005

Chari River in the Sahel region near N’Djamena, Chad.

I watched him circling and I started to wonder what was going on.   He came back down through the clouds. It was getting dark and there was a huge thunderstorm right in our path.  The pilot dropped the small craft to search for his bearings.

Fuel was getting low, and we could never make it back to Timbuktu.  To the south, an enormous black wall of clouds loomed from the horizon – a monsoon storm.  In vain, for a half an hour we scanned the landscape searching for an opening.  We had no radio contact, and and no navigational equipment.  We prepared our last thoughts.

Finally, the pilot spotted a millet field, agonizingly small, but flat.  As we thundered in, I watched the wheel of the plane miss a six-foot hole by a few steps.

MALI PLANE

Muddy field, Mali

We shuddered to a stop with a few hard bounces.  Villagers ran out from the surrounding bush in wonderment as the sky opened up.   We slept on the plane that night, and finally found a vehicle to take us back to the capital city of Bamako, fourteen hours of bone-rattling roads.

AFRICA-10037

Niger River, Mali

 

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